1647 THOMAS MANTON. A Plea for Unity in the Church During the English Civil War.
1647 THOMAS MANTON. A Plea for Unity in the Church During the English Civil War.
1647 THOMAS MANTON. A Plea for Unity in the Church During the English Civil War.
1647 THOMAS MANTON. A Plea for Unity in the Church During the English Civil War.
1647 THOMAS MANTON. A Plea for Unity in the Church During the English Civil War.

1647 THOMAS MANTON. A Plea for Unity in the Church During the English Civil War.

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$275.00
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$275.00

A superb sermon preached in the heat of the English Civil War under the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. The Presbyterians and other Puritan Independents and Congregationalists were engaged in a heated philosophical debate regarding the right of more fundamentalist Presbyterians to utilize their new-found power to establish a Covenanted Kingdom based on establishment of something very like Scotland's Solemn League and Covenant. It would, by default, mean persecution of Anglicans, Baptists, and of course Catholics at the National level. 

Some of the Presbyterians were so-inclined, which led to Rogers Williams labeling them as no better than the Priests & Popes with their persecuting and narrow spirit. 

Manton was definitely of the moderate school, calling for unity among all dissenters and warning the imperious spirit that resided in exclusive Presbyterians and the rebellious and individual spirit among other dissenters could the Satanic "hook" used to destroy England. 

Manton, Thomas. Meate Out of the Eater, Or, Hopes of Unity In and By Divided and Distracted Times. Discovered in a Sermon Preached before the Honourable House of Commons at Margarets Westminster on their Solemne Day of Fast, June 30, 1647. London. Printed by M.[ichael] S.[parke] for Hanna Allen at the Crowne in Popes-head Alley, 1647. 52pp. 

EXTRACT:

Some are of a preposterous zeal in lesser differences, and are all for extremity and violence towards those from whom they differ in the least degree and circumstance; most of the centures inflicted by the late Bishops were because of Ceremonies, things not weighty in any regard, no not in their own esteem: some men breath out nothing but rage and threatenings upon the least dissent.

I remember I have read of Joab, David's General, that when his teacher had falsely voweled one word in the Hebrew, he slew him; the place was that charge to destroy Zechan. He read it Zechar, the males of Amalec: It is good to preserve truth, but small distempers will not need so violent a cure; 'tis as if a man should fire an house to destroy the mice in it. Union is good, but rigorous inforcements, especially in trifles & things that lie far from the heart of Religion are not so warrantable. Paul is everywhere most zealous against errors, there is never an Epistle of his but hath some what against them: However, none more earnest than he to bring circumcision and uncircumcision to a profession of brotherhood.

An excellent, balanced work full of wisdom, godliness, and restraint. 

Very nicely preserved complete English Civil War sermon from the Cromwellian era. Complete as issued, removed from a larger sammelband at some point with relevant flotsam on spine and in need of resewing. Tender with full breach at 24/25. Textually crisp. Rare on the market.