1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.
1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.

1649 FIRST KING JAMES STUDY BIBLE + Geneva Notes - Superb Scottish Provenance & Finely Preserved.

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A phenomenal and rare example of the first edition of the King James translation issued with the notes of the Geneva Bible and Junius' notes on the Apocalypse [Darlow & Moule #484]. In essence, this is the first King James study Bible ever issued. It was actually one of the mandates of the translators of the King James version to not include marginal or translational notes, especially those of the Geneva as they were perceived as containing "anti-monarchial tendencies." 

Fascinatingly, the whole production is printed in precisely the manner and style of the iconic Geneva editions, including the engraved titles, but with the Authorized / King James translation. Probably to put dissenting minds at ease.

Additionally, purchased separately in Scotland and bound in by the original Dunlop owners, we bound in a rare Scottish imprint of the Metrical Psalms, based on that of Francis Rous, but "Scottished." The first edition.

Make sure to look at the wonderful Scottish provenance below as well. 

[General Title] The Holy Bible: Containing the Old Testament and the New: Newly translated out of the originall Tongues: and with the former translations diligently compared and revised: By his Majesties speciall commandment. With most profitable Annotations upon all the hard places, and other things of great importance: Which notes have never before been set forth with this new Translation: London. Printed by the company of Stationers. 1649.

[New Testament Title] The New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ: Newly translated out of the originall Greek: and with the former translations diligently compared and revised; By his Majesties speciall commandment. With brief expositions of Theo. Beza upon the hard places, and the Annotations of Fr. Junius upon the Revelation. Which notes have never before been set forth with this new Translation. London. Printed by the company of Stationers. 1649. 

[bound with]

[Separate Scottish Psalms] The Psalmes of David in Meeter. Newly translated, and diligently compared with the Originall Text, and former Translations: More plaine, smooth, and agreeable to the Text, then any heretofore. Allowed by the Authority of the Generall Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland, and appointed to be sung in Congregations and Families. Edinburgh. Printed by Evan Tyler, Printer to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1650. 

The whole is bound in a quality full leather binding, probably 20th century, with new endpapers. The original binding clearly did its job though; the text is largely exceptional. The general title and all of the text is in crisp, clean condition with only occasional handling; all handsomely ruled in red. The Psalms appear to have a blurred red-ruling, though apparently there hasn't been any dampness, so perhaps just the design.

The final Psalmes in Meeter has a very minor corner loss on title and the final two leaves lack a larger section of the lower corner, slightly impacting text. Else, simply a superb example. 

Now for the provenance. This important edition, with the Scottish imprint connection, belonged to three generations of Scottish divines.

Bound into the blank ffep is what appears to be the original eulogy delivered at the interment of John Dunlop, the youngest of the three. It reads as follows:

"Mr. John Dunlop, Minister of the Gospell, Succeeded his Pious Father, Mr. Lewis as Rector of the Church of Skene: which Statione he mantain'd with great Reputatione till the Year 1696. But then he was forced to leave his Pastorall office: because he would not violate his duty to God & his Loyalty to his King, nor approve of those alterations which had been made in the Government both of Church & State. From that time he enclined rather to retire & employ himself wholly in the Service of God & prosecutione of his Studies; than to Struggle against the torrent of the times, or be tortured with ye fierce disputes of Contending Parties. 

His Learning set him on a levell with the most accomplished Divines. He was a most assiduous, Judicious & instructive Preacher. He was ane Zealous defender of Primitive Christianity & the Antient Government of the Church. And for innocence & holiness of life; for Celibacy & Chastity, may justly be compared to the Primitive Fathers. 

He was exceeding bent on relieving the Necessities of the Indigent, & other works of Charity & Mercy, according to his Ability. 

After he had born the Shocks of Cross Fortune & the torments of a long & painfull disease with a truely Christian Fortitude, he chearfully submitted to death. He prudently shared his remaining substance among his Relations & Friends, after He bequeathed his library of Excellent books to the Marischall Colledge of Aberdeen. He resigned his Soul to God in the 55th Year of his Age on the 27th day of April in the year of our Lord, 1714. And appointed his body, in hopes of a blessed Resurrection, to be interred in this place with his Grandfather."

The two persons mentioned are:

John Dunlop [1659-1714] was son of the prominent Scottish theologian, Ludovic [Lewis] Dunlop. John was educated at Marschal College, became Minister at Skene was deprived in 1695 for his seeming refusal to take part in either what he perceived as the unrest of Presbyterians or the repressive moves of the Crown. So he resigned the ecclesiastical conflict and served as a writer, theologian, etc. 

Ludovic [Lewis] Dunlop [1620-1691]. was son-in-law of William Douglas, Professor of Divinity at King's College, Aberdeen. He studied there and married Douglas' daughter. 

It is then inscribed on the obverse of the general title

"Mr. William Douglas, Professor of Divinitie in old Aberdine his Bybel."

There is a monument to William Douglas [d.1665] in Old Aberdeen Church-Yard [where all three are buried] which reads, "To Mr. William Douglass, minister of God's word, who, after he had served the pastoral cure of the church at Forgue, with great piety, for the space of 16 years, and afterwards had sustained and discharged the office of professor of theology in the king's college of Aberdeen, for the space of 22 years, with profound learning and greatest praise, and had served God and his church by his voice, life, and writings, retired from the living, as above, and whose living and lasting name this his monument will extend to all ages, erected by Mr. Lewis Dunlop, minister, his son in law." 

[also]

"Mr. John Dunlop Minister att Skeen Dyed the 25 April 1714 aged 55 and was buriedin the Church yaird of Aberdeen under his Granfathers Stone. Catharine Dunlop Spouse ot the Deaseasd Alexr Forbes Cragie Dyed January 20 1716 aged 73 and buried in the Churchyaird of old Aberdeen under her Granfather's Stone."

Then signed by Andrew Dunlop, John's son, after the Psalms, followed by a four page 17th century MSs regarding Dunlop family history apparently written by George Dunlop. It is faded and challenging to read, but may well reward the diligent.