1698 SAMUEL WESLEY. Who Will Stand Against the Workers of Iniquity. RARE!
1698 SAMUEL WESLEY. Who Will Stand Against the Workers of Iniquity. RARE!
1698 SAMUEL WESLEY. Who Will Stand Against the Workers of Iniquity. RARE!
1698 SAMUEL WESLEY. Who Will Stand Against the Workers of Iniquity. RARE!
1698 SAMUEL WESLEY. Who Will Stand Against the Workers of Iniquity. RARE!

1698 SAMUEL WESLEY. Who Will Stand Against the Workers of Iniquity. RARE!

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A rare and wonderful survivor; not only a fascinating piece of background for John Wesley's ethics and approach to holiness, but sixty-five years later, Wesley would be asked to speak before the same society and would speak, in honor to his father, from the same precise text.

The Society for the Reformation of Manners was the counterpart to the theological debates of the era. Many pastors believed that, as upset as many divines were about the theological compromise that was rife in the late 18th century, it was the moral laxity that impacted the average English person more profoundly. 

As Samuel says, "our infamous theatres seem to have done more mischief to the faith and morals of the nation than Hobbes; . . . with as much reason we may exclaim against our plays and interludes as did the zealous fathers against the pagan spectacles, and justly rank those, as they did the others, among those pomps and vanities which our baptism obliges us to renounce and abhor." 

Wesley, Samuel. A Sermon Concerning the Reformation of Manners, Preach'd at St. James's Church, Westminster, Feb. 13. And afterwards at St. Brides, to one of the Religious Societies. London. Printed for Charles Harper. AT the Flower-de-Luce over against St. Dunstans Church in Fleetstreet. 1698. 43pp + adverts.

Text: Psalm XCIV. v.16 "Who will rise up for me against the Evil-doers, or who will stand up for me against the Workers of Iniquity?" 

Textually complete, first two leaves disbound, rest tender. Perhaps lacking a final blank.