1776 JOHN FLETCHER. Vindication of John Wesley's Calm Address to American Colonies at the Onset of the Revolution.
1776 JOHN FLETCHER. Vindication of John Wesley's Calm Address to American Colonies at the Onset of the Revolution.
1776 JOHN FLETCHER. Vindication of John Wesley's Calm Address to American Colonies at the Onset of the Revolution.
1776 JOHN FLETCHER. Vindication of John Wesley's Calm Address to American Colonies at the Onset of the Revolution.
1776 JOHN FLETCHER. Vindication of John Wesley's Calm Address to American Colonies at the Onset of the Revolution.

1776 JOHN FLETCHER. Vindication of John Wesley's Calm Address to American Colonies at the Onset of the Revolution.

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A very crisp, early printing of a fascinating piece of history. In 1776, John Wesley immediately issued his "Calm Address," which in essence argues that taxation is biblical and normative, that the Americans are in breach of their oaths and agreements with England, and that America would apologize and play nice with England. Wesley did not receive the response he had hoped for. 

As was somewhat usual for Wesley, he would start theological or ideological conversations [or public disputes, debates, etc., whatever you'd like to call it] and Fletcher would come to tidy things up. Wesley had an incredible mind, but to me he has always seemed a bit impulsive theologically. Fletcher was much more thorough and nuanced and better able to conciliate and bring clarity. 

In the present, Fletcher essentially walks over the same three ideas but with more clarity and explanation. He also includes a discussion of the role of slavery in the war, etc.

Rare in any state.

Fletcher, John. A Vindication of the Rev. Mr. Wesley's "Calm Address to Our American Colonies:" in some Letters to Mr. Caleb Evans. London. Printed and sold at the New-Chapel, City-Road; and at the Rev. Mr. Wesley's Preaching-Houses in Town and Country. 1789. 72pp

Clearly part of an earlier sammelband, but complete as issued and in very tidy, clean condition. A very good example.