1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.
1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.
1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.
1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.
1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.
1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.
1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.

1783 BENJAMIN TRUMBULL. Exceptionally Rare Sermon on Providences & Miracles of God in the American Revolutionary War.

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An exceptionally rare sermon preached by one of America's most prominent historians and divines upon the occasion of the formal end of the hostilities associated with the American Revolution. 

Trumbull's sermon on preached upon the death of George Washington was sold at Sotheby's for in excess of $5,000.00 [Lot 552, Barbara and Ira Lipman Collection, April, 2021]. The present, of equal or greater historical significance, is rather more scarce on the market than the desirable Washington sermon.

Extracts:

"In the late years of our distress and treading down we had great and frequent occasions of assembling before the Lord with fasting and sackcloths, and of pouring out our souls before him. When we were unskilled in arms, unprovided for war, unknown among the foreign nations, and when we had made no alliances with the powers of this world, Britain poured upon us all the thunder of her arms, the strength of battle and war. A formidable fleet distressed us by sea, ravaging our coasts for more than a thousand miles in length. An army of near fifty thousand veterans & British and foreign mercenaries, in one quarter and another, with numerous negroes and savages were laying waste our frontiers, or the interior parts of the country. With merciless fury our towns and cities were laid in ashes, our hardy and faithful citizens either slain in battle or murdered in cruel captivity. We trembled for our substance, for our wives and children, for our liberties and lives. Every thing which could be dear to us, either as men, or christians, was at stake. We knew not when men thus rose up against us, but that they would have swallowed us up quick; but that our country and our all would have been lost; or at best, but that we and our children should have been hewers of wood and drawers of water to them that hated us.

Indeed, had it not been the Lord who was on our side, the waters had overwhelmed us, the stream had gone over our soul. Blessed be the Lord, who hath not given us a prey to their teeth. Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers."

Trumbull below lays out his simple aim; and it provides the framework for spending the majority of the discourse discussing the American Revolution and the providences attending the Americans in their battle for liberty from their British tyrants. 

"He is also to be praised for his wondrous works; For his works of wisdom, power and goodness, comprised in the text under the general name of his mighty acts. Praise Him for his mighty acts. To this view of the words it will be natural, 

I. To say something of the excellent greatness and mighty acts of God, for which he is to be praised. Among these such as relate to the American Revolution demand special notice.

II. To show, very concisely, what is implied in praising God, in a right manner, for his greatness and glorious works."

He then proceeds to, with great detail and earnestness, demonstrate the manifold miracles, providences, and instances of grace and providence which effected the unpredicted American victory over the British. Extensively footnoted with historical material. 

Trumbull, Benjamin. God is to be praised for the Glory of His Majesty, and for His Mighty Works. A Sermon Delivered at North-Haven, December 11, 1783. The Day Appointed by the United States for a General Thanksgiving on Account of the Peace Concluded with Great-Britain. By Benjamin Trumbull, A. M. Pastor of the Church in North-Haven. The Second Edition. New-Haven: Printed by Thomas and Samuel Green. 28pp.

Inscribed, "Gad Talcott's Book
Given by Captain Asaph Trumbull
April 23, 1784." [Hand of Asaph Trumbull'

And also,

"Gad Talcott's
Book" [Hand of Gad Talcott]

Captin Asaph Trumbull [1738-1821] was brother to Benjamin Trumbull, author of the present discourse. Both born to ]also] Benjamin Trumbull, often went by the name "Deacon" Trumbull, settled in Hebron near Gilead Meeting House and fathered 12 children prior to the beginning of the hostilities with Great Britain. He served as Second Lieutenant during the American Revolution in 1777 under Captain Isham of the 8th Company, in the 6th Battalion of Wadsworth's Brigade. He appears to have been promoted to Captain just prior to the end of hostilities in 1783. 

Captain Gad Talcott [1745-1830] was apparently a family friend; originally from Hartford, he passed away in Gilead, near the home of Asaph Trumbull. Given to him just after the war. He entered the war as a private and through excellence of service achieved the rank of Captain by its end.  

Good - to fair condition. Blank title stained at top third impacting inscription and some at inner margin not impacting text; else generally clean with handling, toning, and occasional foxing with foredges and corners turned and rolled. Final leaf [27, 28] has a jagged tear toward the inner margin extending 40% up the page from the bottom; not impacting text. Nearly disbound. Complete.