1791 CHANDLER ROBBINS. Sermon on God's Blessing and Favor on America Preached before John Hancock.
1791 CHANDLER ROBBINS. Sermon on God's Blessing and Favor on America Preached before John Hancock.
1791 CHANDLER ROBBINS. Sermon on God's Blessing and Favor on America Preached before John Hancock.
1791 CHANDLER ROBBINS. Sermon on God's Blessing and Favor on America Preached before John Hancock.

1791 CHANDLER ROBBINS. Sermon on God's Blessing and Favor on America Preached before John Hancock.

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An important sermon by Chandler Robbins, considered part of the "Black Robe Regiment," of ministers who used all means to work for the Freedom and Independence of America prior to, during, and after the American Revolution. In many instances, this included taking up arms.

The present sermon is an important one; it lays out a fresh vision of the original puritan ideal of America as God's "new Israel." The text is millennial in nature, asking John Hancock and Samuel Adams to look to the future to see America as a "coming of Heaven to Earth" where the nations can see the goodness of God and His reign at work in an entire nation. 

Important sermons by him are preserved as part of the David Barton's "Wall Builders" archive. 

"II Chronicles, Chap. XII. Verse XII. Last Clause. -And also in JUDAH things went well. A Short, but a very striking description of the prosperous state of a community. - Maty it ever characterize the growing Empire of this Western World - and, till time shall be no more, may 'things go dwell' with United AMERICA!"

". . . collective bodies, or societies - as they are composed of various orders and individuals, each connected with, and subservient to the other; the health and prosperity of the whole, is then only maintained, when the several parts and members of the body politic preserve their proper places, and regularly and faithfully perform the duties of their various states. - When this takes place, 'things go well with them' - they are in a state of political health. - These things, at least constitute the internal welfare of a community, and the condition of such a people, must be really happy, provided they are not disturbed by enemies abroad, and are virtuous at home."

"In a word, it goes well with a State, when they enjoy the blessing of a good government, wisely administered - when no foreign invasion disturbs their peace - no internal sedition interrupts their harmony - especially, when, in addition to this, benevolence and virtue reign among them - when the fear of God rules in their hearts, and love to men, influences their conduct - when they practice sobriety - temperance - industry, and all the social virtues, and 'lead quiet and peacable lives in all godliness and honesty.' - Under these happy circumstances, who, but must acknowledge, 'things go well' with such a community."

". . . we may safely affirm that to be the best Constitution, which provides for, and secures to a people the greatest degree of REAL LIBERTY, and which has the best tendency to promote mutual confidence among the several orders of society." 

"In every free government, founded on social compact, it is the indisputable right of the community to elect their own rulers. When they are chosen, the path of their duty is clearly pointed out, as with a sun-beam. The constitution defines their power, and Heaven has declared the end of their appointment. 'He is the Minister of God to thee for good.' This is the great object, to which they are to direct all their views. 'As men, they have, like other men, private interests and private views; and may as lawfully pursue them. But in their public capacity, they can of right, have no other end, than that of the public happiness.'"

"America stands like the sun in the Heavens, the centre of light, and the wonder of an admiring world, who feel the influence of its rays. There the persecuted will find rest - tortured virtue and exiled worth, will take refuge among them, from every quarter of the world."

"Our greatest danger, apparently, is from ourselves. And there are two sources, more especially from whence I apprehend, this danger may arise - A criminal abuse of our liberty - and a careless inattention to the exercise of our rights."

"There is a great danger to be apprehended from the abuse of LIBERTY. It cannot be denied, that, by our constitution, we enjoy all that liberty, that a people can rationally desire. We have for instance, the inestimable privilege of appointing our own rulers. 'Our nobles are from ourselves and our Governor proceeding from the midst of us.' But, great as this privilege is, how easily may it be abused? As when in the choice of the public officers, men are influenced, either from party spirit - from private pique and resentment, or other selfish motives, to neglect men of known and tried abilities, and the best characters, and in their stead, to advance those to public trust who are destitute of the most essential qualifications.

Another important privilege, in a free Commonwealth, is, that of writing, speaking, and publishing, with decent freedom, our sentiments on public men and measures. But is this liberty abused and prostituted to licentious purposes? It undoubtedly may be, many ways. As when persons, of little information, take liberty, upon the smallest pretense, to censure the conduct of their rulers, to vilify their characters, and to declaim against the measures of administration, thereby exciting jealousies and destroying the public peace." 

Robbins, Chandler. A Sermon. Preached before His Excellency John Hancock, Esq. Governour; His Honor Samuel Adams Esq. Lieutenant-Governour; The Honourable Council, and the Honourable Senate and House of Representatives, of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, May 25, 1791. Being the Day of General Election. Boston. Thomas Adams. 1791. 51pp.

Good + example with half title, marked as duplicate on half title, faint remains of inscription at head. Removed from a sammelband with typical side-stitching and tender. Text itself is exceptionally crisp and clean. Final leaf is lacking just the outermost upper corner, not impacting text.