1795 HENRY SCOUGAL. The Life of God in the Soul of Man. Wonderful Americana Provenance
1795 HENRY SCOUGAL. The Life of God in the Soul of Man. Wonderful Americana Provenance
1795 HENRY SCOUGAL. The Life of God in the Soul of Man. Wonderful Americana Provenance
1795 HENRY SCOUGAL. The Life of God in the Soul of Man. Wonderful Americana Provenance

1795 HENRY SCOUGAL. The Life of God in the Soul of Man. Wonderful Americana Provenance

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Wonderful early American imprint of Henry Scougal's [1650-1678] puritan classic on the necessity of the work of the Spirit in true Christianity. This work very much sets the stage for later important like Philip Doddridge's Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul that nearly defined the Great Awakening. George Whitefield himself said he never truly understood Christianity until he read Scougal. 

Fascinatingly, it bears at the head of the title the signature of Joseph Habersham [1751-1815]. Habershon played an important role in the American Revolution. He was first a member of the Georgia Provincial Council in 1775 and then a Colonel in the 1st Georgia Regiment of the Continental Army. After serving with honor in the war, he was Speaker of the House in Georgia in both 1782 and 1785; also being part of the Georgia Convention that ratified the United States Constitution. He then served as Mayor of Savannah Georgia in 1792 and 1793.

Joseph's exploits as a Colonel are recorded by John Mebane in Joseph Habersham in the Revolutionary War, produced for the Georgia Historical Society. 

Then, in 1795, George Washington appointed him Postmaster General, a post he held until the beginning of Thomas Jefferson's term in 1801. 

Scougal, Henry; Archibishop Leighton. The Life of God in the Soul of Man, or, the Nature and Excellency of the Christian Religion. To which is Subjoined, Rules for a Holy Life by Archbishop Leighton. Philadelphia. Ormrod & Conrad. 1795. 140 + 28pp

Textually, a complete and generally clean and solid example. Both boards are detached and binding itself fair to poor.