1799 CYPRIAN STRONG. Early Fourth of July Sermon on American Independence & the Wisdom of the American System.
1799 CYPRIAN STRONG. Early Fourth of July Sermon on American Independence & the Wisdom of the American System.
1799 CYPRIAN STRONG. Early Fourth of July Sermon on American Independence & the Wisdom of the American System.
1799 CYPRIAN STRONG. Early Fourth of July Sermon on American Independence & the Wisdom of the American System.

1799 CYPRIAN STRONG. Early Fourth of July Sermon on American Independence & the Wisdom of the American System.

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Fascinating sermon on God's agency in the formation and promotion of the United States by Cyprian Strong [1764-1816]. He graduated Yale in 1763 and was Pastor in Portland, Connecticut from 1767 until his death. Strongly Edwardsian, he opposed the half-way Covenant and was a leading voice toward integrating the convictions of the Solemn League and Covenant into the documentary framework of America. 

. . . The enlargement of [our] territory can never be an object of pursuit, if our desires are kept within the limits of moderation. The extent of the United States is sufficient, to render them one of the greatest nations on earth. . . . 

Cyprian Strong. A Discourse, Delivered at Hebron, at the Celebration of the Anniversary of American Independence, July 4th, 1799. Hartford. Hudson and Goodwin. 1799. 18pp

In the passage of scripture which has been read [Deut. 4.34], you observe, that Moses calls up the attention of the Hebrews, to the important period and event of their being formed into a distinct nation - taken out of the midst of another nation . . . In the American revolution, we have a repetition of the same wonderful interposition of Divine Providence. Although the colonies, which now compose the United States, were at a distance from the seat of the British government, yet I need not inform this audience, that we were considered as being under its control; and the British parliament claimed a right to make laws for the colonies, which were binding, in all cases whatsoever. And it is well known, that they extended their authority so far, as to tax us at pleasure, for the purpose of raising a revenue. It is very true that we were not reduced into a state of such complete bondage as the Israelites were in Egypt; yet, it is equally true, that a principle was advanced, by the British parliament, which, if pursued to its full length, must have terminated, in the same servitude and ignominious bondage. It was that principle which alarmed the fears and aroused the apprehensions of the people. . . 

. . . The evils we have experienced, as has been observed, have arisen from external circumstances and measures; not from the nature and constitution of our own government. While the attention of the citizens of the United States was confined, to their own affairs and internal concerns, they were eminently happy and prosperous. And it is presumed, their happiness would have been continued to this day, had they not listened to foreign intrigues; and could have been pleased, with a government which had energy, as well as a regard to equal and rational liberty. . . 

. . . The enlargement of [our] territory can never be an object of pursuit, of our desires are kept within the limits of moderation. The extent of the United States is sufficient, to render them one of the greatest nations on earth. . . . 

No copies on the market. Textually complete and good; removed from a larger sammelband with the attending residue on spine and abrasion to inner margin at the first and last leaf. Some light toning and foxing; moderate tide mark across head of last half of text.