1824 ADAM CLARKE. Extensive 2pp Autograph Letter Reproving a Moving Company. Very Attractive.
1824 ADAM CLARKE. Extensive 2pp Autograph Letter Reproving a Moving Company. Very Attractive.
1824 ADAM CLARKE. Extensive 2pp Autograph Letter Reproving a Moving Company. Very Attractive.

1824 ADAM CLARKE. Extensive 2pp Autograph Letter Reproving a Moving Company. Very Attractive.

Regular price
$450.00
Sale price
$450.00

Wonderful, crisp 2pp autograph letter by Methodist theologian, Adam Clarke. Clarke was arguably the most influential Methodist thinker, aside from Wesley, during the whole of the 19th century. Nearly every Methodist minister and many Methodist lay people owned and used his commentary; it was the "gold standard" for interpretation among them and continually in print, as it remains to this day. 

The present letter dates to 1824 and is addressed to Messrs Snell, Robins & Co. They were a local furniture company in Barnsley with whom he is not a happy camper. They continue to operate there to this day. I must admit to considering leaving a Google Review; something to the effect of, "Poor service; filed complaint in 1824. Still waiting. Still ticked. Adam Clark"

"Messrs Snell, Robins, & Co,

Gentlemen,

There are some mistakes in this bill, which you will have the goodness to rectify. My agreement with your house in Liverpool was 4/ for all Packages; Furniture, Books, &c. and on this bill, you charge the furniture at 8/. The other carriers wished to have 7/ for furniture and 4/ for the rest, but I gave preference to your house because all was to be taken at the same price. Mr. William Comer, Exchange Buildings, made the agreement, and informed me as above.

For the convenience of carriage, the legs of my telescope were packaged up apart from the instrument, &c. and so the leg of a small turn about table. These you have charged as four packages, in cartage, instead of two. The same may be said of the frame on which a small box sits which is charged separate from the box. These you will have the goodness to rectify. Indeed, the articles themselves, thus separated, amount to but a few pounds weight, and the cartage itself is extravagant beyond anything I was ever called to pay in London, Bristol, Manchester, or Liverpool. I know what you have said on this head to Mr. Hook, but I am still satisfied that the charge is exorbitant, however custom may have sanctioned it. And when the orders have been so numerous, I think some consideration should be paid to matters of this kind. I need not add that the breakage, thro sheer carelessness, is such as can never, at any expense, be sufficiently repaired.

I am, gentlemen,
Your humble servant,
Adam Clarke

4 Canonbury Square
February 19, 1824"

etc., etc. etc.

Very fine condition.