1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.
1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.

1832 WESLEYAN REVIVAL. Important Autograph Book, Including Revivalist James Caughey, Original Compositions, etc.

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An absolutely delightful and important early finely bound leather autograph book of Wesleyan-Methodist autograph original and extracted sentiments, hymns, and quotations collected it seems by Miss Ann Hartley of Wakefield between 1831 and and 1845. It seems she was likely the sister of John Hartley [b.1820], himself a prominent Wesleyan circuit preacher and grandson of very influential Wesleyan, John Anderson [who is included in the present volume].

Includes important revivalist James Caughey, missionaries and Wesleyan authors William Arthur, Thomas Squance, and Thomas Cryer, various Wesleyan Connexion Presidents, etc. 

Importantly, the volume has been undefiled by poachers; often someone would have removed a choice bit over time. This is 100% original, as found.

Just a sampling includes:

George Chambers, Wakefield. August 12th, 1831. Wesleyan Methodist Preacher at Macclesfield. Biography published in the Wesleyan Methodist Magazine, April, 1875. He quotes Solomon on the true beauty of a woman.

William Jackson, Wakefield. September 3rd, 1832. Wesleyan Methodist Preacher at Maxchester. A signed quotation, "Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, etc."

Robert Newton [1780-1854], Wakefield. November 14, 1842 Revd. Dr. Robert Newton was the son of a farmer, and was converted to Methodism in 1798. After becoming a minister, he served primarily in northern circuits and raised large sums for overseas missionary work. Apparently he was handsome, and a persuasive preacher with a powerful voice, described by Benjamin Gregory in 1841 as ‘the grandest figure and the best-loved preacher in the whole Connexion.’ "And another book was opened which is the book of life. In that book may the name of the fair owner of this album be found written."

Over the years, Newton opened numerous chapels and became repeatedly secretary of the Methodist Conference. Unusually, he served as President of the Conference four times (in 1824, 1832, 1840 and 1848).

John Slack. Wakefield. September 6, 1832. Slack was a prominent Methodist and defender of Wesley. In 1812, a Catholic divine interacted with what he saw as Wesley’s misrepresentations of Catholic doctrine. This work was then answered by John Slack. Interestingly enough, Slack’s contribution to the book is a six line stanza by John Wesley. "Jesus, I bless thy gracious power, etc."

William Leach. Wakefield. July 7th, 1836. William Leach was circuit preacher at Wakefield and author of the classic Methodist work on the power and history of prayer meetings. He also urged at the Conference for the establishment of the first Wesleyan Methodist Institution. An original, lengthy quotation on various values of external reputation and internal character.

Gregory A. Page. Stockport. November 12th, 1844. Page was circuit preacher in the Manchester and Bolton circuits. Original 9 line poem. Unpublished apparently. 

W. H. Clarkson. Stockport. June 3, 1841. Clarkson was a prominent revivalist agitator among the Wesleyan Methodists who was slandered by more mainline Wesleyans in the Wesleyan Times. The consequence of which saw the WT’s editor tried for libel and sentenced to time in jail.  An original poem addressed to Ann  Hartley, "Pure love divine, and heav'n born peace unknown / Leading to joys celestial and renown / Late may'st thou rise to that bright realm above / Where sounds the voice of universal love, etc." 13 lines.

John Pugh. February 10, 1835. Pugh was from the prominent Pugh family of ministers and missionaries among the Wesleyan Methodists, and himself a circuit preacher. Four stanza hymn, “The Lamb in the Midst of the Throne.”

John Anderson. Leeds. November 20, 1832. Anderson [perhaps the grandfather of our recipient], entered the Wesleyan Methodist ministry in 1812. He was soon recognized as an outstanding preacher of the gospel, of whom Benjamin Gregory claimed that, “. . . he was the most irresistibly eloquent Methodist preacher of the time.” He took his place among the leading figures on such occasions as the opening of Oxford Place Chapel, Leeds. It was said that only his early death, while he was Superintendent of the Liverpool North Circuit and Chairman of the Liverpool District, prevented his being elected to the presidential chair. He published sermons, including The Faithful Minister of Christ (1832, on the death of Adam Clarke) and The Spirit of a Great People (1839, on the centenary of Wesleyan Methodism). He died at Liverpool on 11 April 1840.

Harriett Cockayne. Of the influential Wesleyan Methodist Cockayne Family [Hannah’s memoir is recorded in the Wesleyan Reform Magazine of 1870]. Beautiful original full page inscription on Heaven.

Mr. Cockayne. A circuit preacher of the Wesleyan Methodists. An extract found at the beginning of Lord Byron’s Bible.

George Browne Macdonald. Sheffield. December 7, 1835. Macdonald was a very prominent Wesleyan. Born in 1805, he was one of the most eloquent men among their ranks. He here pens two stanza’s from James Montgomery’s Meet Again. Macdonald is remembered as well as having had three daughters who ended up marrying and mothering very prominent personages. Alice became the mother of Rudyard Kipling, Georgiana married the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Burne-Jones, Agnes married the President of the Royal Academy, Edward Poynter, Louisa gave birth to Stanley Baldwin who was the Prime Minister three times over, etc.

Thomas Stead. Sheffield Conference. August 18, 1835. Stead was another prominent circuit preacher, and it seems the grandfather of W. T. Stead, the famous publisher and editor who published important works on the Welsh Revival, etc. He here records Wesley stating that if any doctrines could be termed fundamental, they would be justification and the new birth, etc.

Thomas H. Walker. August 25, 1835. A Wesleyan circuit preacher in the Bradford Circuit. He here pens a six stanza original hymn; appears unpublished elsewhere we can locate.

William Cockayne. Sheffield. [1835]. Influential Wesleyan divine and signatory to the 1835 Connexion meeting, etc. He here records lines from Sigourney on the unexpected death of a wife.

Manuscript tune “100th Psalm”

John Bowers. Sheffield. July 27, 1843. Bowers entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1813 and became an outstanding pulpit orator. Having been for some years General Secretary of the Theological Institution, he served as House Governor of Didsbury College from 1843 to 1864 and was President of the 1858 Conference. Here records “An Arabian Proverb.”

George Turner. Stockport. November 11, 1844. Prominent Wesleyan circuit preacher, author, and controversialist. He here records three stanza’s from the hymn by Anne Steele, Father what’er of earthly bliss.

John Watson. Stockport, 1840. Father of the famed Wesleyan Methodist theologian, John Watson [born 1832] and himself a prominent circuit preacher. He here records two stanzas from a hymn.

John Hurley. Sheffield, February 6, 1841. Important Wesleyan revivalist. A two stanza hymn, apparently unpublished and likely original.

William Arthur. May 24, 1842. One of the most important authors of the Wesleyans; his Tongue of Fire remains read today and he was active in revivals of the mid-19th century, etc. He here records I John 4.8, “God is love,” in English and then in Canarese. This was written during his early years where he was a missionary to the Wesleyan Missionary Society to India. He ended up serving as its Secretary for many years.

Thomas Cryer. May 24, 1842. God is love in Tamil. He was also a Wesleyan Missionary to India. His wife’s biography, after her untimely death in India, was much distributed in a similar manner to that of Adoniram Judson’s wife and that of Harriet Newell in the United States.

Thomas Hall Squance, Sheffield, August 11, 1843. Two stanza hymn in a very shaken hand by the then increasingly unwell pioneer missionary to India. Born in 1790, he served as a Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society missionary in Ceylon from 1814 until 1821 and in Madras from 1821 until 1823. He was one of the pioneers in the region, working concurrently with William Carey and Adoniram Judson. He corresponded with Thomas Coke and served the cause of Wesleyan missions his entire life.

James Bromley. Wakefield. February 11, 1842. Quotation by one of the more prominent preachers and authors among the Wesleyan Methodists.

Thomas Llewellyn. Wakefield. December 26, 1843. Fine quotation of John 3.16 from a prominent Welsh Wesleyan.

Samuel Tindale. Wakefield. August 30, 1841. Quotation of Milman on death from another Wesleyan circuit minister.

Theophilus Pugh. Sheffield. August 8, 1843. Prominent Wesleyan divine [from the influential Pugh family, many of whom were Wesleyan Methodist or Primitive Methodist divines]. An original poem of 9 stanzas, apparently unpublished, “Where is Happiness to be Found?”

James Caughey. Wakefield. May 1, 1845. Wonderful full page inscription in the hand of perhaps the Wesleyan – Holiness revivalist of the time. His works on the revivals of the period were published extensively in the United States and in England. He writes, “Aim at pleasing God in every thing, and seek your first happiness in Him. This practical and experimental Christianity. James Caughey.” During Caughey’s services in 1845 in Wakefield, it is recorded that over 200 were justified and over 130 professed to receive the experience of entire sanctification.

Plus Thomas Wigfield of Rotherham, Anne Bromley [wife of James above], James Hawson of Rotherham [extensive exposition, original on 2 Corinthians], etc. etc.

Also, a few very fine quality drawings are included as well.