1856 C. H. SPURGEON. The Earliest Defense of C. H. Spurgeon Ever Published!
1856 C. H. SPURGEON. The Earliest Defense of C. H. Spurgeon Ever Published!
1856 C. H. SPURGEON. The Earliest Defense of C. H. Spurgeon Ever Published!
1856 C. H. SPURGEON. The Earliest Defense of C. H. Spurgeon Ever Published!

1856 C. H. SPURGEON. The Earliest Defense of C. H. Spurgeon Ever Published!

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A very scarce publication published by "Alabaster and Passmore," defending their new best-selling author. Spurgeon was but 22 years old at the time, and an investigative journalist from the Daily News had written a particularly acidic item against Spurgeon that was published in pamphlet form, entitled, "Sayings and Doings." I believe it was the first attack on Spurgeon in published form [of which there were many over the next few years] and this the first defense of Spurgeon.

The only other copy we trace is in the British Library. An absolute gem for the Spurgeon collector.

A Daily Observer [Pseud.]. A Reply to the Remarks of the "Correspondent of the Daily News," Published in a Pamphlet entitled, "Sayings and Doings." The C. H. Spurgeon; His Extraordinary, "Sayings & Doings" at Exeter Hall and New Park Street Chapel, Southwark; by a Daily Observer. London. Alabaster and Passmore. 1856. 8pp.

The attacks on Spurgeon were often leveled against him on the grounds of his insistent Calvinism [much more to the forward in these early years], his manner of delivery [which was often emotive and colloquial], and as being a self-promoter [though he was nowhere near alone in publishing his sermons, etc.]. 

The reporter had accused Spurgeon [extracts in the present pamphlet] of:

"irregular, imprudent, and audacious violations of propriety," "dangerous fanaticism," and "utter ignorance of theology," in his preaching.

And, again, "What! A young man like Mr. Spurgeon, pretending to understand theology . . . knowledge that belongs only to wise and reverend seignors, or mighty travellers? Nay, I'll not have it. Away, proud youth! And let thy elders teach thee propriety." 

Good +, removed from a larger sammelband, final leaf unevenly trimmed. Crisp and clean.