1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."
1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."

1868-1897 GEORGE MACDONALD. Small Archive of Letters and Artifacts by C. S. Lewis' "Master."

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$2,450.00

A fine assemblage collected by a life-time pursuer of all things MacDonald. These are the last pieces of an extensive collection of rare MacDonald letters, books, and manuscripts. Long placed in important public and private collections, these are the pieces our collector retained until the very end . . . 

1. MacDonald, George. The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke. A Study with the Text of the Folio of 1623. London. Longmans, Green, and Co. 1885. First Edition. 277pp.

Very scarce in any state and only issued in one edition. This example boldy inscribed on the ffep entirely in MacDonald's large, liquid script, "Loraine Estridge with kindest regards from George MacDonald. March 23, 1897." 

George MacDonald wrote, “By this edition of Hamlet I hope to help the student of Shakespeare to understand the play—and first of all Hamlet himself, whose spiritual and moral nature are the real material of the tragedy, to which every other interest of the play is subservient.”

 George MacDonald lectured more often upon William Shakespeare’s play of Hamlet than on any of his many other lecture subjects. He believed the play to be “the highest work of Shakespeare—he suspected he was right in saying it was the highest work of art in the world.” (Glasgow Herald 9/10/1890.) “Hamlet was the most marvellous product of human thought, wonder, and sense of mystery.” (Birmingham Daily Gazette 1/16/1866.)

A period desciption of MacDonald's lectures on the play indicated “He showed that the Prince presented all the characteristics of a Christian gentleman. The lecture was studded with many gems of thought, and irradiated by frequent flashes of caustic humour, and tempered by reverent allusions, which embodied whole sermons of exhortation and edification.” (Northern Echo 9/10/1890.) Macondald even preached a sequence of five sermons drawn from Dialogue.

It should also be noted that of all the lectures MacDonald delivered, the only he ever pursued publication of were the those of the Bard's Hamlet

In original wraps with light wear and loss at head of spine. Textually solid, crisp, and clean. Lacking in many established MacDonald collections. Peter Harrington of London has a similar copy of MacDonald's less scarce Within and Without on the market at north of $8,000.00

2. An 1872 Autograph Sheet.

We used to acquire good, clean examples of MacDonald's autograph with some regularity. Those now long being exhausted, the prices for even a fugitive autograph are increased dramatically. The present, likely given at the request of an individual by mail, reads simply, but in a large, clear hand, "With best wishes, George MacDonald. Nov 20, 1872."

3. Autograph Letter to Shakespeare Scholar and Friend, Richard John Cunliffe.

A charming, friendly letter, written late in life, addressed almost certainly to fellow-Scottish Shakespeare lover, lecturer, and author of The Shakespearian Dictionary, etc. Richard John Cunliffe. 

"Friday Evening.

Dear Mr. Canliffe,

I am disappointed
for myself, & vexed for
you that I should
have carelessly an-
swered my wife when
she asked me about
your kind invitation.
I mean carelessly as 
to the date & consequent
possibility of the matter; 

for I have to lecture
in the country that
evening, and could 
not get back in
time for your dinner.
I am very sorry, for
I fear it may put 
you to inconvenience.
Pray accept my apology
& believe me

****** yours.
George MacDonald

We are both
disappointed
at not being able to
be with you."

4. An 1868 Witty & Sassy Letter by a Tired MacDonald who only needs to write a "Ghost Story."

A wonderfully lively letter from a worn-out George MacDonald. He's headed to holiday and has been working like two horses and an ass. He also mentions he'll do now work while gone other than writing a ghost story for Anthony Trollope. Trollope at this time was the editor of The Cornhill Magazine. MacDonald's The Portent had first appeared there as a serialized novel in 1860. The requested "ghost story" requested seems never to have manifested itself, despite Trollope's rapping and knocking. No such story appears in The Cornhill in 1868 or 1869. Perhaps MacDonald's vacation was more relaxing than expected and he just let the ghost lie in peace. 

The letter signature clipped, effecting a couple of lines and the autograph. Also, a sort of Frankensteined early taping repair, which we quite like. 

"The Retreat
Hammersmith
Aug 23
1868

My dear White,

Fo more reasons than
one I wish I had answered your
first note which I fully intended
to do. But I have been work-
ing like two horses and one
ass since then, trying to get
away for a week, which 
happy release dawns
tomorrow morning, & I
shall write nothing while

I am away but a ghost
story Anthony Trollope
wants from me.

I did once know a 
fellow who read his poetry
to his friends in cabs and 
omnibuses. When I attain
to his eminence & not till
then will I write verses
for young ladies. Don't 
you think a Russian 

portage-stamp would do? Or
a hair from the great Cha****
beard? Or the length of
Pester John's foot? It is
an insane and absurd 
Passion. But the request
comes from you - therefore

*************************

enjoying yourself. I hope
to serve you better the next
time you do me the honour
to ask my help.

Meantime - as the Scotch
say, with Kind regard to Mr. White,

**************************"